Root Canal Treatment

A root canal is one of the most common dental procedures with well over 14 million performed every year. This simple treatment can save your natural teeth and prevent the need for dental implants or bridges. For more information on root canal treatment at our belmont endodontic office. Click Here for more info.

Endodontic Surgery (Apicoectomy)

Endodontic (root canal) surgery can be used to locate fractures or hidden canals that do not appear on x-rays but still manifest pain in the tooth. Damaged root surfaces or the surrounding bone may also be treated with this procedure. The most common surgery used to save damaged teeth is an apicoectomy or root-end resection. For more information on root canal surgery at our belmont endodontic office. Click Here for more info.

Non-Surgical Retreatment

With the appropriate care, your teeth that have had endodontic treatment will last as long as other natural teeth. Occasionally, a tooth that has received treatment may not heap as expected or n may continue to exist. Sometimes, the pain may occur months or years after treatment. If so, Endodontic RetNon-Surgical reatment may be neerequired. Click Here for more info.

Management of Cracked Teeth

With their more sophisticated procedures, dentists are helping people keep their teeth longer. Because people are living longer and more stressful lives, they are exposing their teeth to many more years of crack-inducing habits, such as clenching, grinding, and chewing on hard objects. These habits make our teeth more susceptible to cracks. Click Here for more info.

Treatment of Traumatic Dental Injuries

Injuries to the mouth can cause teeth to be pushed back into their sockets. Your endodontist or general dentist may reposition and stabilize your tooth. Root canal treatment is usually started within a few weeks of the injury and a medication, such as calcium hydroxide, will be placed inside the tooth. Eventually, a permanent root canal filling will be implanted.



What is the dental pulp?

The pulp is the soft tissue that contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. It lies within the tooth and extends from the crown of the tooth to the tip of the root in the bone of the jaws.


What happens if the pulp gets injured?

When the pulp is diseased or injured and can’t repair itself, it dies. The most common cause of pulp death is a cracked tooth or a deep cavity. Both of these problems can let germs (bacteria) enter the pulp. Germs can cause an infection inside the tooth. Left without treatment, pus builds up at the root tip, in the jawbone, forming a “pus-pocket” called an abscess. An abscess can cause damage to the bone around the teeth.


Why does the pulp need to be removed?

When the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result. Certain byproducts of the infection can injure your jaw bones. Without treatment, your tooth may have to be removed.


What does treatment involve?

Treatment often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, your general dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in problems of the pulp) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then  cleaned and sealed. Here’s how your tooth is saved through treatment:

  1. First, an opening is made through the crown of the tooth. An opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
  2. The pulp is then removed. The root canal(s) is cleaned and shaped to a form that can be filled.
  3. Medications may be put in the pulp chamber and root canal(s) to help get rid of germs and prevent infection.
  4. A temporary filling will be placed in the crown opening to protect the tooth between dental visits. You might also be given medicine to help control infection that may have spread beyond the tooth.
  5. The temporary filling is removed and the pulp chamber and root canal(s) are cleaned and filled.
  6. In the final step, a gold or porcelain crown is usually placed over the tooth. If an endodontist performs the treatment, he or she will recommend that you return to your family dentist for this final step where the crown of the tooth will be restored.

How long will the restored tooth last?

Your restored tooth could last a lifetime, if you continue to care for your teeth and gums. However, regular checkups are necessary. As long as the root(s) of a treated tooth are nourished by the tissues around it, your tooth will remain healthy.

At Gaston Endodontics, we acknowledge that the most important person in our office is the patient.  We understand that because the patient often needs to be seen on an emergency basis, and therefore  we need to be immediately accessible.

Our staff works together to provide the highest quality endodontic care available. Gaston  Endodontics invests in training, supervision and events designed to bring together our support staff, which includes: dental assistants and administrative staff. To better serve our patients, we are a bi-lingual office.

Our Top Priority

Your comfort throughout all phases of treatment is a major consideration. So that we may accommodate all patients, our office is exclusively latex free. Our practice exceeds the highest standards of infection control advocated by the American Dental Association, the CDC and OSHA. We utilize the latest barrier techniques and autoclave sterilization to eliminate any risk of crosscontamination. Our priority is to provide state-of-the-art endodontic care, while maintaining a strict operating protocol.

We will provide you with the finest and most state-of-the-art treatment available. We believe that people should have their own healthy teeth for their lifetime. However, not all teeth are savable and root canals are not always indicated. Therefore, you have the right to be educated and understand your treatment needs. We welcome any and all questions.


Endodontic FAQ

What is endodontics?

Endodontics is a branch of dentistry recognized by the American Dental Association involving treatment of the pulp (root canal) and surrounding tissues of the tooth. When you look at your tooth in the mirror, what you see is the crown. The rest of the tooth, the portion hidden beneath the gum line, is called the root. Though the outer portion of the root is a hard tissue called dentin, the inside channel or “root canal” contains a pulp of soft tissue, blood vessels and nerves.

Bacteria that are introduced into the pulp as a result of tooth decay, periodontal disease, tooth fracture or other problems, can severely damage the pulp. When that happens, an endodontic specialist removes the diseased pulp to save the tooth and prevent further infection and inflammation. After successful endodontic treatment, the tooth continues to perform normally.


I’m worried about x-rays. Should I be?

No. While x-rays will be necessary during your endodontics treatment, we use an advanced nonfilm computerized system, called digital radiography, that produces radiation levels up to 90 percent lower than those of already low dose conventional dental x-ray machinery. These digital images can be optimized, archived, printed and sent to cotherapists via e-mail or diskette. For more information contact Schick Technologies, Inc.


What about infection?

Again, there’s no need for concern. We adhere to the most rigorous standards of infection control advocated by OSHA, the Centers for Disease Control and the American Dental Association. We utilize autoclave sterilization and barrier techniques to eliminate any risk of infection.


What happens after treatment?

When your root canal therapy has been completed, a record of your treatment will be sent to your restorative dentist. You should contact his office for a follow-up restoration within a few weeks of completion at our office. Your restorative dentist will decide on what type of restoration is necessary to protect your tooth. It is rare for endodontic patients to experience complications after routine endodontic treatment or microsurgery. If a problem does occur, however, we are available at all times to respond.


What new technologies are being used?

Operating Microscopes: In addition to digital radiography, we utilize special operating microscopes. Magnification and fiber optic illumination are helpful in aiding the doctor to see tiny details inside your tooth.